Archive for April, 2004

Now kicking my ass: Dissection

Tuesday, April 13th, 2004

Some albums just sneak up on you. You hear them the first couple times and they make no impression whatsoever, and you file it away in favor of something else new that’s more of an attention-grabber. Months or even years later you come back to it on a whim and it kicks your ass.

This is currently happening to me with Dissection’s Storm of the Light’s Bane. I bought it a year or so ago when I was really getting into death/black metal, and somehow it just didn’t grab me. This happens with a lot of death metal albums for me - the aesthetic is such that it tends to all blend together for me unless I’m familiar with it or listening closely. As I result I have a bunch of death/black metal albums that I think I like, but I don’t really know very well.

Storm of the Light’s Bane was one of those until about an hour ago. I’d planned on going to bed, but my MP3 software decided to start playing it, and it hooked me. Now I’m wide awake and resisting the urge to headbang despite a rather persistent headache. Damn you, Dissection.

Thurston Moore in the New York Times

Thursday, April 8th, 2004

Thurston Moore of Sonic Youth has an op-ed in the New York Times today. Interesting tidbit: Nirvana toured with The Boredoms? Really?

Dave Kerman, neo-prog pioneer

Monday, April 5th, 2004

Oh this is fucking rich: “With [Chris] Cutler as his role model, [Dave] Kerman embarked on a labyrinthine journey through neo-prog.”

This wonderful misappropriation of terms is found in an otherwise very cool article about Kerman in Westword, which appears to be a Denver newspaper/website. Recommended reading, pun intended.

Chris Cutler talks about Dagmar Krause

Saturday, April 3rd, 2004

The Wire, the UK magazine that covers “new music”, meaning avant-garde stuff of various colors, is fairly hit-or-miss for prog fans. The magazine is fairly condescending to anything resembling conventional prog, and most of its coverage will appeal only to avant-prog and RIO types. That said, for those people, the latest issue is a gem. There’s a pretty good feature-length article on Art Bears - as well as one on György Ligeti - that makes the issue worth its price.

The Art Bears article, as well as the review of The Art Box in the Soundcheck section, make the case that Winter Songs is the group’s crowing achievement, a sentiment that doesn’t seem to be shared by most RIO folks. The article is particularly notable, though, in that it includes sentiments from Dagmar Krause, whose voice was conspicuously absent from the booklet to The Art Box. Also interesting are Chris Cutler’s thoughts on Krause:

“‘I don’t write simple or obvious words,’ he admits, ‘they are not easy to sing. Dagmar had the amazing ability to make them make sense, to make them sound obvious. She sings from the inside and her accent helps to lift words out of their slots and give them a slightly resonant displacement. No one else could have done what Dagmar did on those LPs. I’m still amazed by her.’”

Also of interest to prog types in this issue are reviews of new albums from Einstürzende Neubauten, Absolute Zero, and the Satoko Fujii Quartet (Fujii’s band with Tatsuya Yoshida), as well as the Amon Düül II live DVD, Plays Phallus Dei.