Posts Tagged ‘disappointment’

Wow, I thought John McLaughlin was awful

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2007

Last Friday, John McLaughlin and his current band (The 4th Dimension) played at George Washington University’s Lisner Auditorium, and despite the fact that I had a very busy and exhausting weekend ahead of me, I made a last-minute decision to show up. I would like to say I didn’t regret it, but I’d be lying. This might come as a surprise to a bunch of folks, but I really actively disliked this concert.

Instead of the burning Mahavishnu-like fusion I was hoping for, what I got was something that had plenty of million-notes-a-minute soloing but little in the way of edge or tension. An excessively smooth bass sound and some really, really silly keyboard timbres (courtesy of Gary Husband, with whom I’m more familiar as a drummer) contributed to the overall feel of watching four amazing musicians play something akin to virtuosic smooth jazz. I was pretty much bored from the minute I set foot in the auditorium, and while I stayed for the duration of the show, hoping things would improve, they never did. To me it almost seemed like McLaughlin was channelling John Petrucci — Dream Theater gone fuzak — while Husband insisted on playing virtuosic keyboard solos using the thinnest, tinniest, silliest possible sounds. Seriously, even the cheesiest prog band would avoid the dorky keyboard sounds he was employing.

Uh, so, I didn’t exactly enjoy that one. You win some, you lose some.

Isis @ the 9:30 Club: unlistenable

Wednesday, March 14th, 2007

Last Sunday night, Isis appeared at the 9:30 Club to play for a mostly sedate crowd of post-rock and nerd-metal types. I was among them, and suffice it to say I was disappointed at best and angry at worst. Here’s what I posted to Bob’s ProgAndOther list:

I saw them last Sunday in DC and was really, really disappointed. Glad the show in Philly had good (if loud) sound - the DC show was ridiculous. I think there was a monkey behind the soundboard; the bass was so boomy it overwhelmed everything else, and the kick drum was equally bad - if not worse because it was so loud it took all the subtlety out of the “quiet” parts. I could barely hear the guitars at all, and even though Isis is one of my favorite bands and I know all their material, there were a couple songs I couldn’t recognize because I literally couldn’t tell what they were playing. I was pretty seriously annoyed at the sound guys and left after 45 minutes or so.

I saw them put on a great show last year, so I pretty much blame this fiasco entirely on the club’s crappy sound. Oh well - at least I did manage to snag that Live 4 CD :)

I hate it when idiot soundmen ruin otherwise great performances. And this is the second time this has happened to me lately at the 9:30; Mastodon a little while back was similarly unlistenable. Thankfully, most of the rock bands that pique my interest these days are playing at smaller venues with slightly saner volume levels.

I went to see Mono, I didn’t see Mono

Wednesday, April 13th, 2005

I’ve struck a new low in concertgoing: I allowed myself to be chased off by opening acts. Tonight I went to see Mono, a Japanese post-rock band who has released one album on Tzadik and two on Temporary Residence. Opening for them were two bands; one I’d never heard of, and the other was Eluvium, label-mates with Mono on Temporary Residence. The first band (the one I didn’t know) was quite bad. I feel like post-rock is a genre with little margin for error: bad post-rock tends to be pretty atrociously dull. This band featured an incredibly boring drummer, a serious problem in this particular kind of music, and just seemed gratuitously and painfully loud. Granted, my impressions should be taken with a grain of salt because I could only make myself stay through two songs before I left the club to make a phone call and wait for Mono.

Well, that was my intent, anyway… when I went back in over an hour later, Eluvium had yet to start. I wasn’t too keen on hearing them (er, him — turns out this is a one-man band), but I figured I’d give it a shot. Well, I did, and I hated it. I’m not sure why. This guy plays a kind of drone music, using lots of delayed guitar loops and the occasional piano interlude, that I found alternately boring and grating, like Fripp’s Soundscapes gone horribly wrong (I couldn’t get Fripp’s phrase “a lot of noise from one guitar” out of my head). I suspect I would like his material much better on record than I did live, oddly enough — I just didn’t have the patience for it in a live setting, particularly since all the speakers in the club were overdriven, resulting not only in painfully high volume levels but also in fairly ridiculously obvious distortion. I kept looking back at the soundman and I swear the guy must have fallen asleep standing up. What the hell was he doing?

Anyways, by the time Eluvium had gotten through four ear-splitting pieces, none of which I could tell apart from one another (except for the fact that two were played on piano and two on guitar), I was in a bad enough mood that I stepped out of the club again just to save my ears and nurse a budding headache. At that point I contemplated my options; it’s a weeknight and the show had been delayed an hour and so Mono wouldn’t start until midnight or later, it seemed. At that point I decided to cut my losses and get the fuck out of there.

It’s too bad, really; under different circumstances I might like Eluvium, and I’m sure I would have really enjoyed Mono. I have their second album and there are some absolutely stunning moments on it. But after those two opening acts I just wasn’t in any kind of mood to enjoy music at all. I couldn’t bear the thought of going back into the club and getting pummeled by another noisy band (even one that I liked). I didn’t put my headphones on on the way back home, and I haven’t even put a CD into the player since getting back (which never happens). I’m sure it has more to do with my mental state than their music, but those two bands can be proud to have turned me completely off from music for the rest of the night. Not to mention make me spend eight bucks and then leave before seeing the band I’d come to see. Ha.

You win some, you lose some. Actually, I’ve had very few bad concert experiences up until now, so I can’t really complain.