Posts Tagged ‘Metallica’

Dream Theater cover Master of Puppets!

Friday, March 29th, 2002

Last night I went to see Dream Theater in New York. It was their second show in the city, and was promised to have a “very special” setlist. If I’d been following Ytsejam or alt.music.dream-theater, I would have know what was so special about it, but I hadn’t been, so I didn’t. Anyway, it was a pretty good show. LONG. They went on promptly at 8:00 and I didn’t get out of the theater until nearly midnight… and there was only one 15-minute intermission in the middle.

I wasn’t really blown away by the first set. I’m not nearly as big a Dream Theater fan as I used to be, and the last couple of albums never really impressed me. Thankfully, the band played a set that spanned all of their albums, which was cool - my favorite part was when the noisy finale of “Misunderstood” transitioned into the heavy riffing of “Lie”. It was also interesting to hear James LaBrie try to sound like Charlie Dominici when the band did “The Killing Hand”. And “Take The Time” really reminded me of how much more I like the band’s early material. At about 9:45 the band went offstage for the intermission; fifteen minutes later they were back and they settled into the rather tedious “Six Degrees of Inner Turbulence” - the 40-minute-long “song” that makes up the entire second disc of the latest album. To my surprise, it went by pretty fast, and parts of it were pretty powerful live. Not as bad as I expected.

Then the band went offstage again. Clearly, something weird was about to happen. The opening of “Pull Me Under” started all of a sudden, and then disintegrated with a screech. The group came back onstage and Petrucci started playing what I immediately recognized as the opening guitar part to Metallica’s “Battery”. Sweet, I thought - a great song to cover. The band crunched through “Battery” convincingly - more than convincingly, it was fucking awesome - and then went straight into “Master of Puppets”. Even better! Turns out they covered the entire Master of Puppets album from start to finish. Now, I like Master of Puppets better than I like Dream Theater’s own recent work, so I was pretty damned happy. They did a great job with it - I was particularly impressed by Petrucci, who pulled off all the solos really well. After that, there were a couple encore songs (ending, of course, with “Pull Me Under”), and then it was over.

Master of Puppets was definitely the highlight of the show for me. “Take The Time” and “Lie” were pretty good too, but otherwise I wasn’t all that impressed. I was definitely much more affected by the Dream Theater show I saw two years ago on the Metropolis tour; probably just because I was a much bigger fan back then. Still, it was worth the trip.

Oh yeah, a couple weeks ago I saw The Dismemberment Plan live, for the third time, this time back home in North Carolina. It was a great show marred by really bad sound. I also really liked one of the other bands, Death Cab for Cutie, and just recently downloaded mp3s of their latest album, The Photo Album - really good, laid-back, melodic indie-pop.

Maybe some reviews will be up soon. Between work and Ultimate I’m struggling to find time for things like eating, sleeping, and breathing, but what the hell.

Pitchfork is too cool for you

Monday, February 5th, 2001

On second thought, I will comment on the quote I posted here yesterday. Why would the reviewer praise Metallica’s music so much (”talent for writing incredible, theatrical pieces of music”, “best heavy metal in existence”) and then up and call then “bad”? Seems to me that he’s got the mentality of, well, since they’re so “unstylish”, they can’t be good even if I happen to like a couple of their pieces. Or even if they are among the best of their genre. I’m too cool to like those has-beens. I’m hipper than thou.

Man, fuck that.

On a completely unrelated note: here’s a nice Godspeed You Black Emperor! FAQ, courtesy of the gybe! mailing list.

Pitchfork on Metallica

Sunday, February 4th, 2001

Quote sans comment, from Pitchfork’s review of the Apocalyptica album Plays Metallica by Four Cellos:

Something else about this release is that it also displays Metallica’s talent for writing incredible, theatrical pieces of music. While the classic metal band may be unstylish and… well… kind of bad, in general, they’ve produced some of the best heavy metal in existence by writing what is essentially classical music played loudly. Of course, that was before the Load hit. Now they’re just five years late for a money train headed for Seattle.

No more Napster here

Friday, April 21st, 2000

Thanks to a lawsuit brought by Metallica, Yale has “temporarily” banned students from accessing Napster. Mwahahaha… and about time. It’s not that I feel guilty about ripping off the major labels (which is what’s happening since it seems like very little non-mainstream music goes through Napster), but the whole scheme would set a disturbing intellectual-property precedent if it were allowed to continue freely.

Our custodian friend has not returned for me to give him his copy of Hybris. Hmm.

What’s spinning, February 8 edition

Tuesday, February 8th, 2000

In anticipation of the Dixie Dregs / Dream Theater show here in New Haven in a couple weeks, I just received the Dregs‘ live King Biscuit recording yesterday. The country/Southern influences don’t turn me off, so I do like the music quite a bit, and I look forward to the show even more now.

Something straightforward today: what’s been spinning recently:

  • The Dixie Dregs - King Biscuit Flower Hour Presents - good folk-influenced fusion
  • The Flower Kings - Flower Power - still trying to figure out the hype
  • Magma - Retrospektiw II - love this version of MDK
  • Metallica - …And Justice For All - the more I listen to this the more I like it
  • Rush - Counterparts - I’d forgotten how much I like the instrumental “Leave That Thing Alone”
  • Von Zamla - 1983 - surpassed Tortoise as my favorite of the 1-29-00 acquisitions

What is it about English speakers that makes them so indifferent to music sung in foreign languages? How important are lyrics to the average music listener? I’ve become so accustomed to music that stresses instrumentals over vocals that I no longer remember how much lyrics used to matter to me. Or is it just the fact that songs sung in anything other than English sound funny to an English speaker? Come to think of it, why the sudden fascination with mangling Spanish and putting random bits of it into “Latin” songs meant for American audiences?

In the depths of my gloom
I crawl out for you
From the peaks of my joy
I crawl back into
Tearing me down every time you smile
Every shining time you arrive
Sunny Day Real Estate, “Every Shining Time You Arrive”