Posts Tagged ‘Transatlantic’

Good chaser for Transatlantic: Ruins

Thursday, May 2nd, 2002

I listened to the Transatlantic debut album today. It blew my fucking mind - it’s SO BAD. What a travesty. How could I possibly have said anything positive about it way back when? Jesus Christ.

I threw on some Ruins to cleanse my ears. That’s more like it. I’ve been on a bit of a punk rawk kick lately (and not just Ruins type punk, but also like Dead Kennedys, Black Flag, etc punk). Loud, raw, and aggressive is the rule of the day. Why I put that pansy Transatlantic shit on at all is a mystery to me.

Oh, and another thing: after Burning Stone and Hyderomastgroningem, Symphonica also sounds like pansy shit. Funny how that works.

Thoughts on The Mirror Conspiracy

Wednesday, February 14th, 2001

Okay, some comments on the Thievery Corporation disc: to me, it feels like a mellow, sometimes loungey kind of trip-hop without the hip-hop. It’s a blend of electronic music and much warmer, more acoustic elements such as soft vocals and hand percussion. I am, of course, utterly uneducated in this kind of music, hence my use of genre names that probably don’t apply. But a lot of the instrumental parts, especially those with symphonic-esque keyboard washes and the like, remind me of Air or instrumental Massive Attack or the like. I like the use of various ethnic instruments, most obviously the sitar, to spice up some of the tracks. So, overall, this is pretty cool stuff, and remains interesting throughout. But I find it hard to get really excited by it: in the end, I’d probably buy it if I found it used somewhere, but I don’t think I’d go out and hunt it down.

For some reason it never occurred to me that Sigur Rós‘ vocals - the high-pitched, androgynous vocals that they are - might turn people off. That’s a shame - I think the vocals are one of the main reasons their music is so beautiful. Oh well.

Transatlantic is coming out with a new double-live album, according to the Spock’s Beard mailing list. What the hell? Those guys did like ten shows total last year, many of them beset by technical difficulties. Their show at NEARfest, frankly, sucked. And this warrants not only a live album, but a double? You know, these guys are in the wrong genre of music to be trying to get on a money train.

“All of the Above” apes “Close to the Edge”?

Thursday, April 27th, 2000

Whenever I hear the intro to Transatlantic’s “All of the Above”, I keep expecting to hear Steve Howe’s jagged guitar line that bursts into the pastoral intro of “Close of the Edge”. Despite the fact that there are no nature noises in the former song, it seems like the intros to the two pieces are quite similar.

On another “Close to the Edge” note, it bothers me how Ed Macan consistently refers to “sonata” form as the basis for the structure of the piece, whereas I learned - over and over - that “sonata-allegro” is the correct term, with “sonata”, of course, meaning something entirely different. Nitpicks.

SMPTe

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2000

Says Bob Eichler about the meaning of “SMPTe” (see yesterday’s entry): “SMPTE stands for Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers. It’s usually used in reference to the “SMPTE code”, which is a timing code used on all professional audio and video recordings, so that the engineers can refer to a specific spot in the recording, down to a fraction of a second.” SMPT, of course, might also stand for “Stolt, Morse, Portnoy, Trewavas”.

Still hoping my “empty” theory doesn’t turn out to be true, but my hopes aren’t too high.

Didn’t you see Amadeus?

Tuesday, February 22nd, 2000

A good friend of mine, Rich Worf, points out that Richard Wagner was old - by classical standards - when he began writing music: “He was mostly interested in acting and politics and couldn’t even read music until he was 25 or so. That’s still young by jazz standards, but ancient compared to Mozart or Bach.”

The upcoming Transatlantic (Stolt/Morse/Portnoy/Trewavas) album will be entitled SMPTe. Pronounced photetically, this comes out as an odd Spanglish phrase: “es empty”. I hope that doesn’t describe the music.

Forgive me the following undignified indulgence.

Most Amusing Thread Ever in rec.music.classical: “Classical Music: Corrupting Our Youth?” in which one Scott Harper (who, strangely enough, crossposted the thread into rec.sport.football.college) complains about the “Erotica Trio”: “three young, attractive, scantily clad ladies caressing their instruments in very suggestive manners”. There is of course no such trio, Mr. Harper having actually seen an advertisement for the Eroica Trio - who, while they are young, attractive women, don’t exactly dress “scantily”. When presented with this possibility, Mr. Harper promptly called Beethoven a pervert for naming his symphony “Eroica”, and continued: “And no, I don’t ‘get it’… What does the 3rd symphony or a trio have to do with Erotica? Unless you are talking about one of those three-way things, and that is really sick.” It gets better, believe it or not. Read:

In article <38B18FFE.1EEBDC46@erols.com>, hok007@erols.com wrote:

>> Well, I guess theres another example of Beethoven’s perversiveness, eh?
>>
>
>Am I missing something? What is “perversive” about naming a piece of
>music Eroica (i.e., upon the “heroic” figure of a great man)? It is
>*possible* that the Eroica Trio chose the name in part because it
>resonates with the English word “erotic” (and is apt to cause a double
>take in those of us less familiar with its Beethoveenian origins), but
>that hardly makes it or Beethoven perverse.

It is well known about Beethoven’s perversiveness. Didn’t you see
“Amadeus?”

What this guy is even doing in a classical music newsgroup, I have no idea. In addition to his ignorance, he has absolutely no idea what sarcasm is, and he views any argument as a personal attack. What’s with all these Usenet moron types anyway? - they’re all the damn same, I swear. To the newsgroup’s credit, they were fairly tolerant at first, but once Mr. Harper showed himself as an arrogant personality unable to take criticism, they let loose with flames that would do rec.music.progressive proud. I encourage you to go to deja.com and check out this thread… the entertainment is well worth your time. :)

Transatlantic: missed opportunity

Friday, February 18th, 2000

Hmm… I’d forgotten that the Transatlantic supergroup that’s headlining NEARfest 2000 was originally slated to include Jim Matheos, guitarist for Fates Warning, rather than Roine Stolt of the Flower Kings. Shame that fell through - I’ve always enjoyed Matheos’ work (both with Fates Warning and solo), much more than Stolt’s anyway. Oh well.